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Asbestos

Definitions of Asbestos on the Web:

(1)A common form of magnesium silicate which was used in various construction products due to it's stability and resistance to fire. Asbestos exposure by inhaling loose asbestos fibers is associated with various forms of lung disease. (2) The name given to certain inorganic minerals when they occur in fibrous form. Though fire-resistant, its extremely fine fibers are easily inhaled, and exposure to them over a period of years has been linked to cancers of the lung or lung-cavity lining and to asbestosis, a severe lung impairment.
www.repair-home.com/info/glossary%20(a-g).htm

 

is a mineral fiber that can pollute air or water and cause cancer or asbestosis when inhaled. The U.S. EPA has banned or severely restricted its use in manufacturing and construction and the ARB has imposed limits on the amount of asbestos in serpentine rock that is used for surfacing applications.
edugreen.teri.res.in/explore/glossary.htm

 

(1) A common form of magnesium silicate which was used in various construction products due to it's stability and resistance to fire. Asbestos exposure by inhaling loose asbestos fibers is associated with various forms of lung disease. (2) The name given to certain inorganic minerals when they occur in fibrous form. Though fire-resistant, its extremely fine fibers are easily inhaled, and exposure to them over a period of years has been linked to cancers of the lung or lung-cavity lining and to asbestosis, a severe lung impairment.
www.houstonremodeling.com/glossary.htm

 

A toxic material that was once used to make insulation and fireproofing material in houses. Because some forms of asbestos have been linked to certain lung diseases, it is no longer used in new homes. However, some older homes may still have asbestos in these materials.
www.freddiemac.com/homebuyers/glossary.html

 

Asbestos is a natural mineral fiber that was used for many years in the first half of the 20th century in a number of building materials, such as insulation and vinyl flooring. It has been proven to cause lung cancer when the fibers are inhaled into the body. Asbestos removal or encapsulation by law must be done by a licensed professional.
www.greenliving.org/readmore/definitions.html

 

n. Any of several minerals that readily separate into long flexible fibers. Asbestos was formerly used as fireproof insulating materials and has since been implicated a cause of certain cancers.
www.antigenics.com/glossary/words.phtml

 

a mineral fiber that can pollute air or water and cause cancer or asbestosis when inhaled. EPA has banned or severely restricted its use in manufacturing and construction.
www.baaqmd.gov/pie/aqgloss.htm

 

A group of six different fibrous minerals formerly used as fireproof insulation material that can cause certain types of cancer and increase the risk of developing benign intestinal polyps
www.purwater.com/yourwater/glossary.shtml

 

A mineral fiber that can pollute air or water and cause cancer or asbestosis when inhaled. EPA has banned or severely restricted the use of asbestos in manufacturing and construction.
www.akaction.net/pages/glossary.html

 

A common form of magnesium silicate used in various construction products due to its stability and resistance to fire. Asbestos exposure, by inhaling loose asbestos fibers, is associated with various forms of lung disease.
www.homefront.com/glossary/a.shtml

 

A fire-resistant mineral used for insulation and home products that has been found to pose a health hazard.
www.lakeplacidrealestate.com/glossary.html

 

An incombustible fibrous mineral form of magnesium silicate formerly used for fireproofing and sometimes used for the reinforcement of roofing materials.
www.roofhelp.com/Glossary/glossarybase.htm

 

Asbestos Containing Material (ACM), a general term which refers to products and materials which contain asbestos. (see Fig. 1) Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral valued primarily for its heat and chemical resistant properties. The fibers are conducive to being woven into fabrics used for fireproof garments and curtains but also construction fabrics roofing, paper, insulation and molded products. Asbestos has been linked to asbestosis (a respiratory disease), lung cancer and other illnesses. Friable asbestos, that is asbestos which is flaking or crumbling should be removed by a qualified contractor and properly disposed of. Asbestos abatement is not a do it yourself project. (see Fig. 2)
www.enterprisefoundation.org/resources/dss/singlefam/sf&24&in&nc&oo&ss&lg&rin&rnc&uc&sn&el&mupscm17.htm

 

A carcinogenic, fibrous mineral used in a variety of building materials. Home health risks arise when age, accidental damage, normal cleaning or remodeling activities cause the asbestos-containing material to crumble, flake or deteriorate.
finance.realtor.com/HomeGarden/HomeImprovement/Tools/Glossary/CRHO_A.asp

 

A mineral once used in insulation and other materials that can cause respiratory diseases. Asbestos has been clasified as carcinogenic. (See carcinogen) National Safety Council on Asbestos
www.prou.net/utilities/glossary/glossary01.html

 

Natural minerals mined from rock and used in construction. Properties include noncombustibility, corrosion resistance, high tensile strength, and both thermal and electrical insulating capability.
www.appraisalinstitute.org/AI/OnlineEd/detcon_rsc/glossary/glossary.htm

 

A group of impure magnesium silicate minerals which occur in fibrous form. Includes the forms chrysotile and tremolite. Uses include fireproofing, insulation, reinforcing agent in rubber and plastics and paint filler. Hazard: Restricted pulmonary function, dyspnia, fibrosis, confirmed human carcinogen producing lung tumors.
www.setonresourcecenter.com/safety/hazcom/glossary_of_chemicals.htm

 

A mineral fiber that can pollute air or water and cause cancer or asbestosis when inhaled. EPA has banned or severely restricted its use in manufacturing and construction.
www.sbeach.navy.mil/Programs/Environmental/IR/Reading_Room/Glossary/G_AB.htm

 

Group of naturally occurring minerals that separate into fibers. The asbestos family includes actinolite, anthophyllite, chrysotile, crocidolite and tremolite.
www.pantex.com/ds/pxeisa3a.htm

 

A mineral material once widely used on clutches and brake linings. Asbestos dust is a known cancer-causing agent.
www.oneleft.net/Automtive_Definitions_And_Definitions_For_Automotive_Parts_A_F.htm

 

One of the characteristics of this fibrous mineral is its high resistance to heat.
www.nrcan.gc.ca/mms/scho-ecol/glos_e.htm

 

Asbestos is a naturally occurring mineral fiber extensively used in construction due to its stability and resistance to fire. It may be found in vinyl flooring, patching compounds and textured paints, sprayed acoustic ceilings, acoustic ceiling tiles, stove insulation, furnace insulation, pipe insulation, wall and ceiling insulation, roofing shingles and siding as well as appliances. Exposure to asbestos can be a serious threat to one’s health and has been linked to cancers of the lungs. There are a number of choices available for dealing with asbestos. They include leaving it alone, encapsulation and abatement. Removal of this material is a specialized procedure and should be attempted only by a qualified and licensed expert. Information regarding identification of asbestos, its hazards and safe removal may be obtained from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, Environmental Protection Agency and other governmental agencies.
www.heritageinspection.com/gloss_body.asp

 

A strong and incombustible fiber widely used in the past for fireproofing and insulation. The small, buoyant fibers are easily inhaled or swallowed, causing a number of serious diseases including: asbestosis, a chronic disease of the lungs that makes breathing more and more difficult; cancer; and mesothelioma, a cancer (specific to asbestos exposure) of the membranes that line the chest and abdomen.
www.fusrapmaywood.com/factsheet/gloss.htm

 

A mineral fiber than can pollute air or water and cause cancer or asbestosis when inhaled. EPA has banned or severely restricted its use in manufacturing and construction.
www.njhazwaste.com/glossary.htm

 

A mineral fiber used in some building materials such as flooring, siding, insulation, and roofing. It is presently banned for uses in real property.
www.soldonsusan.com/BG_Chapter_4.htm

 

a fibrous amphibole; used for making fireproof articles; inhaling fibers can cause asbestosis or lung cancer
www.cogsci.princeton.edu/cgi-bin/webwn